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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over the debt ceiling. the closer we get to the debt line, the white house starts talking act what kind of specific impact this would have. in terms of the fiscal cliff, higher taxes on everybody. one thing that will happen without an agreement, all the bush tax rates go away, so everyone's taxes are going to go up. you'll see that emphasized over the next couple weeks. you'll hear the white house talk about what a bad situation there will be after january 1 if this deal is not cut. >> david jackson, "usa today," shira toeplitz, "roll call." we appreciate your time so much we'll talk to you later in the hour as well. >> thank
of the so-called fiscal cliff discussions. then all look at the lobbying going around the fiscal cliff negotiations by clients in washington. our guest is anna palmer. and later a discussion on syria and the response from the international community. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. this week on news makers, the vermont governor and chair of the democratic governors' association peter shumlin. he talks about the fiscal cliff and laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 election. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> in president obama's weekly address, he talks about tax policy, the tax cuts put in place by the previous administration that will expire at the end of the year. then the republican address on the economy, jobs, and education policy. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or
cliff. that is not a good way to talk about what's going on right now. >> mr. reich, let me ask you the same thing. do you think there's code suggesting they are working towards something? because, doug, as you point out, the language was really harsh during this week. but all of a sudden, here we are friday evening and people are saying these kind of soft things that say maybe compromise. what do you think, robert? >> i think doug is right. it's too early to break out the champagne, but undoubtedly, the rhetoric is softening as we get closer and closer to the christmas holidays. these people want to go home. they want to have a holiday. they know that they cannot go home to their constituents and say essentially, i couldn't get anywhere. we're going to go over the fiscal cliff together. and that's particularly true and particularly difficult for republicans because the way the polls are showing the public's anger with this process, the republicans are going to get most of that anger. and they are the same polls that in fact, the gop is listening to and watching, and boehner is very
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)